Palette 2/28/2016 ~

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Alas, thus far I seem to have a rather lurid style. I began this painting by trying to copy a lovely, delicate watercolor by a contemporary artist named Jane Voorhees. Other than a slight similarity in the landforms, however, this painting bears no resemblance to the watercolor. The title is thanks to Nick Drake, of course, whose fame exploded a number of years ago after VW used snippets of this song in a commercial where two young couples in a convertible forgo a party to go spinning down the road in the magical moonlight. But “Pink Moon” is not about magic; it is, almost certainly, about death. Nick Drake suffered from depression; he either killed himself or overdosed on antidepressants. But even his darkest songs are beautiful. Have a listen.

Falling stars ~

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I was hoping this little experiment might look better onscreen. Alas, it doesn’t. There are about four other “paintings” under the top layer. I was trying things with brushstrokes and color, then I’d paint white over most of what I’d done and start again. The only original layer is the bottom right-hand corner, where I got a nice effect with the paintbrush that I couldn’t reproduce later.

As for the palette, I had a devil of a time trying to color-correct that photo and never did get it quite right. Then I got what I call an “accidental crop,” when I’m going from one history state in Photoshop to the prior one, and the piece of the photo that shows on my screen is a much more interesting crop than anything I tried. I really like these accidental crops, despite the resulting pixellation.

This may be the last palette photo I post, unless I get something more interesting, and definitely the last painting, unless I start to do better. Where are the people who were were so insistent I post these to my Facebook page?

American Landscape series no. 4 ~

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I love glass bricks because I find color and form intoxicating and exuberant. This is one of my earliest and most successful glass-brick photographs; it was juried into the LaGrange Biennial (Georgia), a national art exhibit, in 1998—probably the most competitive show I was ever in. I can only hope to do as well again someday. This photograph was taken at a fast-food chain restaurant in Carbondale; many people may be able to read or recognize the sign. Pentax K-1000.

More glass bricks ~

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I should just do what I’ve long thought of doing: buy myself some glass bricks and experiment with them instead of relying on chance. These were taken with my iPhone, highly cropped, and subjected to some color manipulation. I’m going to take some more photos at this same location with my Fuji X10, which should give much better quality images.