RiNo ~

Today I dropped off a photograph for an exhibit at RedLine Contemporary Art Center in Denver (yay! finally got into a Denver show!). Afterwards I headed up Larimer Street for a bite to eat and found myself in what is now called the River North Art District (RiNo for short). It appears to be a rundown industrial warehouse district now partially converted into a trendy, edgy place full of brewpubs, coffee houses, smoke shops, and clubs, many of which host little art shows. It’s the kind of place where you may need to know by word of mouth that there’s an entertainment venue behind a particular unmarked door.

I got a burger at Denver’s recently opened Shake Shack, a chain I hadn’t heard of until the local news channels trumpeted this arriving business as if the second coming was at hand. Then I wandered a few blocks down Larimer Street to Denver Central Market, which houses various eateries and places to buy gourmet foods. In between I took photographs of some of the abundant street art in this district, mainly vibrant murals many of which take their style and inspiration from graffiti.

RiNo seems to be a rapidly changing area. To help label some of my images I consulted Google Maps, which had photos dating to June 2017 and September 2017. Already some of the murals have been reworked and many more appear to have been added. I hope someone is systematically documenting the street art in this area. It would make an interesting book.

Neenah ~

This image, scanned from a negative, is a section of a manhole cover. Neenah, oh Neenah! Your manhole covers “can be found throughout the central United States and parts of Europe,” according to Wikipedia. Long may they resist rust. For those of you who live in Europe, have you seen Neenah in your city? Let me know if you find it. The name is supposedly the Winnebago Indian word for “water or running water” (Wikipedia again).

Dumpster dive ~

These are peeling-dumpster photos (see explanation in the previous post, Under the Sea) that I’ve exhibited various places or that are on my website. But upon going through my old files, I see two or three more that I’d like to work with, so I’ll be staying with this one dumpster a little longer. Four of the photos above were taken with digital point-and-shoots; one was shot on film and digitized. Is the film photo easily distinguished from the rest?